The Wall of Silence

People are afraid to intervene with someone who is having mental health issues or is in crisis. Sometimes it is fear of the unknown and/or a fear of not knowing how to help. They do not know what to do or say, so they sometimes do and say nothing. Nothing and silence hurts, destroys, isolates, wounds and shames.

Silence forms a wall between the people who desperately need help and the people who could help. Silence builds a wall between illness and wellness. Silence creates a wall between life and death.

We should not fear helping people who have mental illness or are suicidal, we should fear what happens if we don’t help them. The lack of doing and saying nothing is not working. We need to help, We need to care. We need to love and support others. We need to talk about it. We need to listen.

We need to make beautiful noises. The silence is too loud.

Image result for silence is the most powerful scream


The Wall of Silence

The wall of silence trembles ferociously as it cries out in pain

and no one comes

no one answers

no one sees

no one cares.

The wall of silence shakes incessantly as it is shamed

from the stares,

the whispers,

the glares,

and the cruelty of their silent words.

The wall of silence

barricades,

isolates,

hinders,

scares,

shames,

destroys

and kills.

The wall of silence prevents

love,

unity,

acceptance,

compassion,

trust,

strength

and wellness.

Tear down the wall of silence by

talking about suicide and mental health issues,

sharing your story,

listening to others,

supporting and caring,

and accepting and loving EVERYONE.

~written by Susan Walz

Tear down the walls of silence by reducing the stigma of mental illness and suicide.

Image result for silence is the most powerful scream


One conversation can change a life.

Image result for suicide prevention month 2018

September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month

So, I will write and share a post every day during the month of September containing important facts, statistics and educational information about suicide and suicide prevention. The name of my campaign is called…

Remember in September.

Today, may be too late.

Prevent suicide yesterday.

Don’t let there be anymore “what if” or “if I only” yesterday statements.

Make your today never become a yesterday you will regret. 

Save lives. Talk about it. Don’t wait. Get help. Don’t let yesterday become too late.

If you have any stories or information about suicide prevention you would like me to share on my blog, please let me know. I would love to share any information you have. Thank you in advance for your contributions.

Together we can do this.

It takes a village…

and this wonderfully beautiful blogging community…

24/7 CRISIS SUPPORT

suicide 25

Copyright ©2018 Susan Walz |myloudbipolarwhispers.com | All Rights Reserved

 

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26 Replies to “The Wall of Silence”

  1. Love this. So true. Great post. Talking helps more than anything, but even for the ill it is hard to say the first word… Keeping it all in thinking youll be a burden is more of an issue because people will find it harder to help. Need to accept yourself as well so you can explain the real you. Everyone and every case is different though.

    1. I agree! People need help, but they can’t help you if they don’t know about it. People also need to stop thinking that the people around them are telepathic! Speak up and say, I need help. You deserve to be loved and helped! 😊🙏🏽

      1. Yes. I agree wholeheartedly. I hadn’t thought about that perspective when I wrote this, but it is so true. It takes both sides. People who are ill need to feel more comfortable to tell others. It needs to be a safer place for everyone to speak up and share that they are not okay. I love the “not telepathic” take on it. That is so true. Sometimes I thought more people knew things than they probably did. Some people may not even knew I was sick etc. We hide our pain from others but want others to help us. Yes. It is hard to ask for help sometimes but we need to get better at it. Me included. We think people don’t want to hear about it, but that is the only way they can help. We just need to keep talking about it and one day it will get easier and better for everyone. Be well, Sue

      2. I agree Sue! Yes! There are just some people who are truly oblivious to a change another person is having. That can even be someone close to them, a spouse or any other close family member may not see a change in you. They really won’t. So it’s imperative that people speak up, build courage to find the help they need. Mental health is slowly becoming a topic of conversation, but there is still a long way to go.
        I remember after my 5th baby finally telling my husband I felt I had the ‘baby blues.’ He was shocked! He didn’t understand it, I looked great on the outside, how could I have the baby blues. His reaction intimidated me so I never brought it up again. After my 6th baby I continued to feel sad, so I mentioned it to my Ob/Gyn, he referred me to a therapist which diagnosed me with depression. This isn’t uncommon, many people feel disappointed and defeated by others initial reaction, don’t! Continue to fight for yourself! Let your doctors know! I was fortunate enough to have a proactive doctor – you will too!
        Great post Sue 🙂🙏🏽

      3. Thank you. You have great insight and it sounds like you are doing well. I am happy you are. Also, I have a friend that has Chiari. I pray you are feeling well and your symptoms are mild. You must be a very strong and resilient person surviving with depression and Chiari and being a mommy of six. Much love and hugs, Sue

      4. Thank you! So happy you know someone with Chiari, your friend will need much of your support.
        I am very good at not allowing others to see/know what’s going on. Many of us do that right?! Someone asks, how are you feeling? And you jump and say, good! When in reality, you’re not. So, to stop the conversation from even advancing, I stop it at its tracks, and say, I’m doing ‘good.’
        As tough as life has gotten after the Chiari diagnosis, I’m as strong as I need to be. He gives me the courage. It’s been so much that at this point I fear the ‘men in white coats’ aka doctors and needles – don’t like them! But they’re things that come with my new life with Chiari. If I don’t accept my Chiari diagnosis? Who will? And it’s a slow process, no need to rush any unreal feelings which can lead a non-authentic life.
        Thank you Sue, likewise, much love to you as well! 😊🙏🏽

    2. Thank you for reading and commenting. I am happy you liked it. When I wrote this I was speaking of my experiences of people knowing of my suicide attempt and/or mental illness but being uncomfortable and not saying anything like it is such a taboo thing to talk about or they just didn’t know what to say so they say nothing. At the same time I didn’t want to always bring it up either. Hmmm… When I was writing I didn’t think of your perspective. I agree with you wholeheartedly. More people would help and could help if they knew. If people weren’t so afraid to talk about it because of stigma or like you said because we don’t want to bother anyone. All true. Thanks for getting another perspective on it. Great addition to my thoughts. I wasn’t thinking of it that way. Thanks.

      1. Absolutely. I kept it in for so long looking at it as a weakness. When I finally let it out people knew when to give me space or to not push me to say and do… I’ll come around when I’m comfortable now that I know how. It’s just a difficult thing for both sides.

      2. It is difficult on both sides. But you did amazing by letting it out. Your alone time and space when needed without the eye rolls and more of an understanding is what you needed – among other things of course. As we mentioned, slowly but surely, mental health will become less of a negative stigma the more people realize it’s real and nothing to be ashamed of.

      3. You are right. It must be tough for loved ones as well. I can’t imagine really. It sounds like you have a good support system of people that love and understand you. I am happy you do. That is extremely imperative for our recovery and wellness. Be well, Sue

  2. ‘The lack of doing and saying nothing is not working. We need to help, We need to care. We need to love and support others.’
    Yesss! 🙌🏽 You hurt the person more with your silence! Speak up, speak the truth, help your brother in Christ that’s crying for help in form of the actions they’re portraying.
    This also reminded me of the, ‘if you see something, say something.’ Indeed!

    1. Yes. We all need to help our brothers and sisters in Christ. I agree. We need to not judge and love and treat others like Jesus would. I agree with you. Thank you for your insights on this. I appreciate you reading and your wonderful feedback. Much love and hugs, Sue

      1. Yes, less judgment will encourage more people to speak up and find help. We’re not perfect, we all have our flaws but we are wonderfully made by Him.
        Thank you Sue, likewise.

    1. You are very welcome and thank you for sharing this on your blog. I find a reblog to be the best compliment. So, again, I thank you from the bottom of my heart. It means a lot to me. Be well. Much love and hugs, Sue

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