Can I “lose” a diagnosis?

About a year ago, I was diagnosed with Major Depression and OCD (obsessive compulsive disorder). It was a diagnosis that was agreed upon both my psychiatrist and I, as we went through the DSM together to make sure we were on the same page.

Throughout this past year, I went through phases of really struggling with some of the physical symptoms of OCD. But after about 6 months or so, it started to decrease. It shows more of as an anxious mind, then being obsessive over certain things unlike before.

14 months after, I moved to a new city, and met with a new psychiatrist recently.

After talking through my past diagnoses with my new doctor, he labeled major depression and generalized anxiety disorder as my diagnoses as he was filling the prescription. He said my thought process seemed more closely to someone that struggles with anxiety, rather than having the obsessive and compulsive behaviors/mindset.

I had to agree with him, but I was a bit lost.

Whenever I spoke about my mental health, I disclosed to others that I struggle with OCD and Depression – and it felt like it was just a part of me that I live my life with.

But when my new doctor said he doesn’t see the OCD part anymore, it felt like an old bud has left me.

Is this normal to feel this way? Or am I holding on to something strange?

Advertisements

15 Replies to “Can I “lose” a diagnosis?”

  1. Everyone heals differently.
    We also will react differently even when the circumstances are almost identical.
    Only you can decide if it is normal or off kilter. If you feel it is abnormal then develop a plan on how you are going to handle your situation.

    1. I agree that we all heal differently and at our own pace. We each have our normal; there is no universal normal! Take good care of yourselves <3

  2. Many diagnoses – mental and physical -are subject to both improvement and worsening. If you have had some quality therapy, it would not surprise me at all to learn that your diagnoses have improved. We can indeed overcome (or learn to manage/mitigate the symptoms of) many conditions. Congratulations on your progress! <3

  3. Title clarification plz: Loose means something is loose, like the opposite of tight. I’m not sure if you meant that or if you mean “lose” as in you lost something.

    I agree with the above comments. What defines “normal?” I personally believe that we are all quirky and that nobody is 100% normal at any given time. 😆 Even if we are diagnosed with something now, we may be fine a month or two from now. I was on depression meds and now I’m not. A month from now I could be back on them.

      1. It happens to the best of us. Sometimes we need a second pair of eyes to find the little errors we otherwise missed 😆

        Have a great evening! 😊🌺

  4. Gah! I have totally been there! I was diagnosed with Bipolar II for years, but recently realized that isn’t really the most accurate diagnosis for me. Right now my diagnoses are also Major Depression and GAD, though I wonder if those are quite right either. You aren’t alone at all friend. Losing my bipolar label was intensely painful because it had become part of who I was, but in the end, it was much better for me to let that go and embrace my reality, even if it left my identity reeling a bit. It took time and lots of therapy, but I’m getting there.

    1. Its funny but not funny in my belief! Funny that I’m holding onto something “bad” but also not funny that I got use to having a disorder as part of my identity.

  5. I have been in a similar situation. It wasn’t until I worked on recovering from my eating disorder that I found out I had anxiety and not just depression. I do believe people can change because not all mental disorders show up when you are young

    1. It almost feels like you’re meeting your long lost family member, but you’re still use to your old family member that you grew up with!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.